Enzymes, Fibers, and Textiles Webinar



Facebooktwitterpinterestlinkedinmail

Recorded August 29, 2013
Register (from the WebEx site, click “View Session Recordings” located in upper right corner)

This webinar will introduce the participants to enzymes as catalysts for the reactions that occur in plants and animals. The major classes of enzymes will be covered briefly, the history of enzymes that have been and are used in textile processing will be discussed, noting advantages in terms of energy use and environmental impact that these enzymes can bring to textile processing, as well as reasons why the use of some enzyme classes has not expanded as rapidly as once predicted.

Ian R. Hardin

Georgia Power Company Professor Emeritus of Textile Science University of GeorgiaPhoto_Hardin

Professor Ian Russell Hardin is the Georgia Power Company Professor Emeritus of Textile Science at the University of Georgia. He spent 42 years teaching fiber, polymer and textile chemistry at Auburn University and the University of Georgia. He has over ninety five scientific and technical papers published in journals, several book chapters, and more than seventy research presentations. He has received extramural funding of more than $7 million for his research. His research work focused on the use of enzymes for fiber chemical processing, as well as unique surface treatments of fabrics. Hardin was a member of the organizing committee for the First International Conference on Biotechnology and Textiles held in 2000 in Oporto, Portugal, and hosted the second such conference in Athens, Georgia, in 2002. Hardin is a Guest Professor at Donghua University in Shanghai, China, and is Academic Advisor at Hong Kong Polytechnic University. He was Head of the Department of Textiles at the University of Georgia from 1994-2004, was Director of Academy of the Environment at UGA, and is a Past-President of the Fiber Society. Hardin received the Olney Medal for achievement in textile chemistry from the American Association of Textile Chemists and Colorists in 2010.

Fees

AATCC Members* Nonmembers
Recorded Webinar US$99 US$149
* AATCC members, contact Kim Nicholson for “member discount” code